Posts Tagged steve hargadon

Wordle, Stripgenerator, and NECC Week

Your first thought might be, how are these all connected?  They’re not.  I was just playing with them last night so decided to put them all together.  I know, not my greatest show of deduction.

Wordle is one of those sites where you can enter in text and it gets turned into a word cloud.  You can copy your url, a blog post feed, your delicious account or just simply paste some text. I came across it here, and after reading Karen’s post wanted to try out my own blog to see if my ideas were being backed up by my words.   Glad to see they are.

Wordle - Create
Uploaded with plasq‘s Skitch!

I’m always looking for little quirky Web 2.0 programs that I can introduce to my students so really enjoyed coming across Stripgenerator in one of Larry Ferlazzo’s many posts about about web tools.  I see it as a tool kids can use for making introductions to unit projects or spicing up presentations.

Classroom Funnies

At NECC Week, I had been playing with a Flip Cam that my work bought for students taking my Web 2.0 class next semester.  I needed to learn how to use it in case kids had questions :), so brought it along and recorded a few short clips.  I was more interested in playing with the camera rather than making a video, but decided to put together a pretty disjointed compilation of what I was able to record.  It has a few highlights though, some scenes from EBC including, Ewan Macintosh’s request for Pearson Learning to turn off their cameras (he was intimidating so I did too after that).  It also has a bit from David Warlick’s session, from Steve Hargadon’s Social Networking in Education session,  and a few other snippets if you’re interested.

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Goods, Bads, and Bests from NECC Week

NECC 2008 was the best conference I’ve ever been to.  Mostly, because it was so dynamic.  Usually I judge a conference only on the quality of the sessions but this one was so much more than lectures.  I wanted to take a couple minutes and reflect on the Goods, Bads, and Bests from NECC Week (EBC, NECC, and NECC Unplugged).

Easily, the best part of EBC and NECC2008 was meeting people from my personal learning networks.

The 2nd best part was participating at NECC Unplugged.  I didn’t get to schedule a session there because my travel plans were made so close to the conference that I had no idea if I would even be attending past Monday afternoon until a couple days prior.  So when I got to sit-in and contribute to an impromptu roundtable conversation with Steve Hargadon, Darren Draper, Robin Ellis, Karl Fisch, and several others from my PLN, I was excited.  We discussed how EBC could be better next year along with social networking in education.  I had been a passive observer at the Blogger’s Cafe until that point, and it feels so much better to contribute to the community.

The third, and last, best part is a little of a selfish one.  I hosted a poster session called Using Web 2.0 to Motivate Student Creativity which focused on Web 2.0 for Beginners and it went really well.  A lot of people stopped to watch our (OCHS) kids talk about their experiences using these tools.  I met hundreds of people and loved talking to educators who really wanted to make their children’s experiences at school more relevant.

The Goods.  The best sessions I sat in were all at EBC.  They were discussions yet, only one of the sessions that I attended at NECC was even close, mostly because they hosted a backchannel chat (pw:necc) through Chatzy. David Warlick and Alan November didn’t dissapoint but Social Networking in Education was the livliest and most passionate session that I attended outside of EBC.

The Bads.  By far the worst part about NECC Week was the lack of wireless connectivity.  In over half the rooms I was in I had nothing, nada, zilch for connection.  Kristen Hokanson said it best to an IT guy trying to solve the problem at EBC once he declared they had no idea so many people would have laptops, “but this is an edtech conference.”  They didn’t have enough access points and in the theater where the spotlight sessions were at, there was nothing.

Those view-blocking Pearson cameras at EBC were annoying, but I wasn’t nearly as mad as others about them recording and profitting from our words.  Spreading information…..good.

The other bad part, which I have encountered at almost every conference I’ve attended, was their take on Online Learning.  When I went to NECC in Philadelphia a few years back, I don’t remember any online sessions so was happy to at least see that strand in almost every concurrent session.  However, most of the sessions weren’t worth attending, the NACOL booth didn’t even have someone sitting at it, and the one session I did attend was horrible.  It was three instructional designers from the University of Houston who lectured for 45 minutes straight about 3 basic lessons you could teach online.  It was like they just discovered e-learning and somehow convinced ISTE to accept their proposal.  I wish they would screen for people who are really doing something with online learning and hybrid schools, its a future of education.

flickr user: kjarrett

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Social Networking in the Classroom – EBC08

Live blogging for 2nd Session at EBC08.  Facilitated discussion with Steve Hargadon hosting and Pearson Learning waving their boom microphones around.

-elgg is a possibilty open source program

- walled garden vs. not, what are the benefits of each?

-  @coolcatteacher – do no start out on open space, teach them in safe space first then move towards public forums when they get etiquette down.

- a lot of people running cover it live, tried to get but FF3 isn’t compatible it seems, budtheteacher told me try it anyway but out of time for this session.

-  How much social web about pedagogical model or creating global citizenship?  Both, but more about education benefit for me since trying to get at-risk kids through hs

- using summize.com to follow even more twitterers who I dont normally follow

- students self-regulating in one example, 300 posts but 3000 comments in a blog project one ran on Ning network and kids self-regulated

-  kids that never talked f2f, was one of smartest kids in class and only did teacher find that out when they got a chat forum going

-look up fishbowl w/ live blogging

- backchannel in classroom is not threatening for f2f

- places to mentor, to teach etiquette cuz have grown up in Wild Wild West @kevinhoneycutt

- kids mentoring kids,

-  why are we zero tolerant with digital when not in analog, kids get in a fight at recess would we close recess.

-  think of everything as learning opportunity

- kids learning how to use these tools in personal lives while teachers learned in professional lives @khokanson says. Rings true, so we need to use these to teach professional behavior.

-Hate my method of liveblogging, need to write next session up a littel different.

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